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Citizen Science Data Quality Conservation and Personal Birding Data Projects


AlexHenry

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I have two questions. Why are stationary checklists more valuable than traveling checklists under a mile? Also, does it make sense to make three checklists for the same place and date if you were there for day 3 hours? Making three lists an hour long each be better for data, or no since you may be reporting the same birds on three different lists? Thanks! 

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4 hours ago, IKLland said:

I have two questions. Why are stationary checklists more valuable than traveling checklists under a mile? Also, does it make sense to make three checklists for the same place and date if you were there for day 3 hours? Making three lists an hour long each be better for data, or no since you may be reporting the same birds on three different lists? Thanks! 

He talks about it in the video.  Stationary nails the habitat down more specifically.  The guy is 4th in eBird Checklist in the world.  He is entering an extreme amount of checklists to nail down specific sites.  

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19 minutes ago, chipperatl said:

He talks about it in the video.  Stationary nails the habitat down more specifically.  The guy is 4th in eBird Checklist in the world.  He is entering an extreme amount of checklists to nail down specific sites.  

That’s what I figured. What about the second question?

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1 hour ago, IKLland said:

That’s what I figured. What about the second question?

I don't remember what he said in the video, but considering he put in 15k checklists at one location pretty sure he is doing them in very short bursts.  Although looking at the hotspot it only shows 8448 complete checklists there, so he must be doing a buttload of Incidentals (?)

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1 hour ago, chipperatl said:

I don't remember what he said in the video, but considering he put in 15k checklists at one location pretty sure he is doing them in very short bursts.  Although looking at the hotspot it only shows 8448 complete checklists there, so he must be doing a buttload of Incidentals (?)

Or he’s not using the hotpsot and he’s using more precise personal locations. 

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3 hours ago, IKLland said:

That’s what I figured. What about the second question?

It would likely be better data, but that is somewhat dependent on what type of observer you are. Keep in mind that if you did three, short, complete checklists at the same location, you are likely not double or triple counting birds because birds on different checklists are not added cumulatively. What I mean is, if you do three checklists for an hour each and submit 10 crows on one, 10 crows on the second, and 8 crows on the third, it doesn't equal 28 crows. The highest count you arrived at was 10.

The problem becomes when people do huge long traveling lists, they can't be sure they didn't double or triple count. Statistically speaking, if you did one long three hour checklist and reported 50 crows, from an eBird perspective, some of those were likely double counted. Whereas, it's statistically less likely to count birds multiple times the less distance you travel and the shorter duration of time your checklist is.

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35 minutes ago, IKLland said:

Or he’s not using the hotpsot and he’s using more precise personal locations. 

He used the specific hostpot to do a comparison of expert counter and other eBirders to see the differences.  He even said the hotspot has over 20k checklists there.  

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On 8/6/2023 at 5:20 AM, AlexHenry said:

Mis-IDed Semipalmated Sandpiper vs Western Sandpiper when one of those is rare is probably a lot easier to clean up than mis-IDed House Finch vs Purple Finch when neither is rare but a lot of people make that mistake.

My regional reviewer sets the filter to 0 for Purple Finch during the CBC, because of the amount of inexperienced birders making observations during that time and Purple Finches are also more uncommon in my county than House.

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2 hours ago, Quiscalus quiscula said:

My regional reviewer sets the filter to 0 for Purple Finch during the CBC, because of the amount of inexperienced birders making observations during that time and Purple Finches are also more uncommon in my county than House.

That’s actually a smart technique. 

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On 8/10/2023 at 7:41 PM, DLecy said:

 

It would likely be better data, but that is somewhat dependent on what type of observer you are. Keep in mind that if you did three, short, complete checklists at the same location, you are likely not double or triple counting birds because birds on different checklists are not added cumulatively. What I mean is, if you do three checklists for an hour each and submit 10 crows on one, 10 crows on the second, and 8 crows on the third, it doesn't equal 28 crows. The highest count you arrived at was 10.

The problem becomes when people do huge long traveling lists, they can't be sure they didn't double or triple count. Statistically speaking, if you did one long three hour checklist and reported 50 crows, from an eBird perspective, some of those were likely double counted. Whereas, it's statistically less likely to count birds multiple times the less distance you travel and the shorter duration of time your checklist is.

So do you suggest doing like 5 short stationary lists during your birding visit around a park, or just do one traveling list for the whole thing which is like day 1.5 miles? 

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17 hours ago, IKLland said:

So do you suggest doing like 5 short stationary lists during your birding visit around a park, or just do one traveling list for the whole thing which is like day 1.5 miles? 

My understanding is that in a case like this you'd do new lists after 1-1.5 hours, as eBird prefers shorter times for lists. The people I bird with tend to use that guideline, in additon to starting a new list when you move to a different location or type of environment.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@Kevin @aveschapinascan you change the title of this thread to “Citizen Science Data Quality Conservation and Personal Birding Data Projects”? @AlexHenryhas given me the ok. The point will be the keep the thread what it has been for discussing data stuff but also to provide a place for us to share any data birding projects we complete or checklists of particular interest data wise. Thanks!

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  • Kevin changed the title to Citizen Science Data Quality Conservation and Personal Birding Data Projects
16 minutes ago, IKLland said:

@Kevin @aveschapinascan you change the title of this thread to “Citizen Science Data Quality Conservation and Personal Birding Data Projects”? @AlexHenryhas given me the ok. The point will be the keep the thread what it has been for discussing data stuff but also to provide a place for us to share any data birding projects we complete or checklists of particular interest data wise. Thanks!

Changed it.

Seems a little long though....

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Just now, chipperatl said:

What is considered a “Personal Birding Data Project”?  Is this like if you are an Excel nerd and have all kinds of data on your own sightings?

No clue 😂

As an example, one think I’m thinking about doing is taking a neighborhood walk every day and keeping track of the bird populations over a year period just for my personal interest. 

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54 minutes ago, IKLland said:

No clue 😂

As an example, one think I’m thinking about doing is taking a neighborhood walk every day and keeping track of the bird populations over a year period just for my personal interest. 

I have 2 Excel files I use.  One that is more county and year focused, and one that is personal records focused.

County/Year  has tabs for:

  • Personal Records - Highs for Months each year, Highs for days each month each year, pace each year, FOY by month each year, County pace overall, % of County seen each year, Counts for Hotspots, days with 70+ birds in a day.
  • Bar charts for species, as I use data from 8 counties around mine.
  • Big Day, Big Month and FY trackers (FY has county sightings, Targets sightings with frequency data, my own coding system 1-5, my year list, a list for remaining birds not seen with frequency rest of the year).
  • ABA and Yard list
  • Overall County records, including non-eBird records I've found.
  • County sightings by Month
  • Personal sightings by Month
  • A ton of other misc data tabs and nearby county records tab (all 8 counties show 325 birds and I can see what birds seen in nearby counties haven't been seen here..ex. Sanderling have been seen in all 7 counties except ours.
  • Part of the data tabs are a calculation based on frequency and time periods seen that help to code 1-5 for birds similar to ABA codes.  

Personal Data file

  • Bar Charts of my sightings
  • Various PivotTables to get monthly/daily data.  Similar to the Sightings List on eBird but I can show it by day.
  • A bunch of location tabs for lookups.  
  • Migration timing to show me Earliest arrival date, Late departure date including the same for the Fall Season.

I want to eventually see if I can update a book that was written in the 70s-80s about birds in this county.  I've found records of just under 50 birds not included in that book.  

 

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  • 1 month later...

I've been trying to bird random parks more to fill in data(mostly because my part of the county is severely underbirded), but also because some good birds can show up in parks where people don't check, especially in socal where nearly all the good landbirds are found in parks. I've found a few things this fall, not as many as I'd like, but my birding time is limited now since I'm on my school baseball team. Most of the parks are surprisingly birdy though and if you have parks that aren't often checked near you, especially on the west coast, check them out. 

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