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meet spot...


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I've got other pictures here and there but this is one of the ones I took a few days back as I wanted to show off this guy/girl to you all. This bird has been at our feeders all winter and the previous feeding "season" at our house it was here also. So a year or so ago I had sent pictures to our eBird reviewer, sort of to rule out a golden-fronted or a hybrid or something. We ended up deciding it was just a red-bellied. I never asked back then but, would you end up calling this a male or a female?  My daughter thinks its a male based on behavior. We really haven't tried to compare size... but on our feeders this winter the females were always far more aggressive than the males... the females would often grab other birds and toss them aside. The males weren't as bad about it. This one seemed to model the lesser aggressive behavior... but, we wanted other thoughts I guess... and just to say here, look at this interesting bird. :)

 

spot.JPG

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2 hours ago, Jabird said:

My understanding is that the females have the broken up red cap.  On the males the red cap extends over the whole head.

That's correct... but, we call this one "spot" because there is a spot where there would be solid red for a male or a blank space for a female. And it's not an age thing as this bird has been like this for over a year.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 9 months later...

Random pointless update... Spot is back. This is the third winter we've had this bird visiting our feeders. I FEEL like this is a migratory bird but, do RBWO migrate? I think this because, we feed all winter(sometimes all year, sometimes not) and he or she didn't show up for quite some time after we put the feeders up...  Like a couple months I think. It's weird what comes in and what doesn't. Last winter we had a male hairy woodpecker, for the first time, visiting our feeders all winter...  This winter, not him... but a male yellow-bellied sapsucker is out there every day and we've never had those at our feeders.

I do wonder where Spot is when he's not around here... is he still around and we don't notice somehow? or???  Either way, it's still pretty fascinating to watch this bird. 🙂

 

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12 minutes ago, millipede said:

Random pointless update... Spot is back. This is the third winter we've had this bird visiting our feeders. I FEEL like this is a migratory bird but, do RBWO migrate? I think this because, we feed all winter(sometimes all year, sometimes not) and he or she didn't show up for quite some time after we put the feeders up...  Like a couple months I think. It's weird what comes in and what doesn't. Last winter we had a male hairy woodpecker, for the first time, visiting our feeders all winter...  This winter, not him... but a male yellow-bellied sapsucker is out there every day and we've never had those at our feeders.

I do wonder where Spot is when he's not around here... is he still around and we don't notice somehow? or???  Either way, it's still pretty fascinating to watch this bird. 🙂

 

AAB range maps might indicate whether a species migrates.  Even if they don't, some birds move around seasonally within their normal ranges.

eBird results narrowed by month might show variations in local populations.

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15 hours ago, Tony Leukering said:

A good photo of the tail from the top side particularly if the tail is partly spread, would be useful in species/hybrid ID.

I'll keep an eye out...  He was just at the feeder but flew before I could get a picture. I did look at the tail and will compare it to the RBWO that come to the feeder today... I was curious so I had the field guide open... I don't know what it would look like if the tail was "spread" there but I'm looking in the first edition of the Sibley's guide and what they shows as "mostly white central tail feathers" matched well... white with large black spots/blotches.  The guide says speckled rump, even though it looks mostly white in the picture. The rump I was just checking out looked like there may have been a few speckles above it but a good solid white patch in there.
Can't guarantee anything but I will TRY to get a picture.  and I'll try to compare to the others at my feeder to see if they look different.
A hybrid would be pretty cool but, even if it's not, spot is fun to have around. 🙂

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So far, it would be easier for me to draw a picture of this bird's rump than to get a picture...  I'm never in the right place at the right time, but I did just get a VERY good look at it. Got one picture but it's through a dirty window AND dirty screen so I could not focus. :(  
I'll try to find a picture from online or something and then edit in what I saw. So I've watched the rumps of all the normal red-bellieds so far and they have interesting patterns on their rump, each one being different enough I feel that if I could see the rump EVERY time, I could name them and know who's who. HA... 
But spot...  So the tail part looks pretty normal for RBWO... and above the rump sure enough has markings... but the rump itself is ALMOST all white... not quite. There's one faint black streak that comes down into it. All the rest had more than one dark marking but spot had just this one.
Maybe I'll get a picture of it one of these days but, no promises.

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