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Looking for a bit of help... This evening we heard awful bird cries from the garden, we ran out in the rain to find a bird being dragged under the porch. I sprayed the cat with the hose so he would let it be, but it appears he took the tail feathers. I couldn't leave it outside, that would be torture, so we have a chick brooding cabinet inside with a warming light. It's been quiet since bringing it in, and appears alert, just scared, despite hopping around ferociously outside trying to fly, without any luck, while screeching loudly. We just moved to Pennsylvania and aren't familiar with the bird or organizations that can help. I attached a picture, we could use some help identifying and figuring out if we can save this beautiful bird. 

20190423_204812.jpg

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This is a male (yellow-shafted) Northern Flicker. There is a green tab at the top of the page that has advice on how to deal with injured birds. The fact that it was unable to fly means it either has a brain and very likely wing injury. It could also be that it's lost its flight feathers and can't fly. Either way, leaving it outside would be leaving it for dead I think. Their main food source in the wild (from what I've observed) is actually ants and beetles. I'm not sure if it will eat the seeds you've provided, but maybe. It's obviously incredibly stressed, and you should keep it in a dark space with ventilation, and contact your local animal rescue shelter ASAP. Either he'll just need time to regrow feathers, or it's (likely) much more serious, and there might not be much hope for this poor little guy. Keep your cats indoors, a study in 2013 found that outdoor cats kill between 1.4 and 3.7 BILLION individual birds each year in the US alone! Even if it's not your cat, maybe talk to your neighbours.

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Thank you... the link at the top of the page didn't work, so I figured I would give a post a shot. We do have dried insects, for the chickens, so I will put that in there for him until we can figure out what to do with him. He's hopping around in the brooder now, hopefully that's a good sign.

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10 minutes ago, Greenier Pastures said:

Thank you... the link at the top of the page didn't work, so I figured I would give a post a shot. We do have dried insects, for the chickens, so I will put that in there for him until we can figure out what to do with him. He's hopping around in the brooder now, hopefully that's a good sign.

I copied and pasted the info from the above link for you. Good luck with the bird.

 

What should I do if I find a baby bird? What if I find a bird that is injured?

Cute, helpless-looking baby or injured birds tug at the heartstrings of every bird lover. We naturally want to jump in and help them, but well-meaning attempts to help sometimes end up hurting the bird. Here are some guidelines to keep that from happening.

BABY BIRDS WITH FEATHERS

  • If you find a bird with feathers all over its body (even though it looks like a baby and/or is being fed by adult birds) it is almost certainly able to fly and has left the nest voluntarily. Babies who have recently left the nest may be less afraid of humans than adults, making it appear that they can’t fly when they can. The best thing to do is to leave the baby where it is; the parents will be back to attend to the baby when you leave. 

  • If the bird is in an unsafe area (on a busy road, for example), you can move it to a safe location as close as possible to the place you found the bird. It’s better to remove such dangers as your dog or children than to move the bird.

  • Give the baby and its parents plenty of space and privacy and the parents will almost certainly return to the baby, or the baby will leave on its own. Check back later to reassure yourself that all is well. 

BABY BIRDS WITH NO FEATHERS, PIN FEATHERS, OR ONLY PARTIAL FEATHER COVERING

  • If the baby is showing skin without feather covering, it may have fallen from the nest or been removed by weather or a predator. Try to find the nest and put the baby back in it. If you can’t find the nest, you can use a small basket or plastic bowl (with holes punched in the bottom) to make a replacement nest; line it with soft grass and secure it in a safe location, such as a tree branch, as near as possible to where you found the baby. If the baby feels cold to the touch, warm it in your hands before placing it in the nest. Give the baby and parents privacy and check back later to see if the parents return to care for the baby. Do not worry about touching the baby bird; most birds have a very poor sense of smell and will not reject a baby if a human has touched it. Having said that, only handle the baby as much as absolutely necessary to replace it in the nest and let the parents take it from there.

Never give the baby bird food or water. Giving the incorrect diet can do more harm than good.

ABANDONED BABY BIRDS

  • If you are sure the baby has been abandoned and is unable to care for itself, contact your nearest wildlife rehabber. It is illegal in the United States and many other countries to keep wild native birds in captivity; that includes trying to rescue babies, unless you have a license to do so. Caring for a baby bird requires significant knowledge and skill, and almost all amateur attempts to do so, even though they are motivated by caring and concern, fail. Follow the instructions you are given until the bird can be taken to the rehabilitation facility.

  • Here is a link to a list of professional wild bird rehabilitators by state. If you are unable to contact a rehabilitator, contact a veterinarian for advice and a referral to a professional who can help you. 

http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/DocServer/9-16-10_correction.html?docID=381

INJURED BIRDS

  • If you find a bird that appears to be unable to fly but has no visible injuries, remove any dangers from the immediate area and leave the bird alone to be sure it’s really injured and not trying to distract you or another predator. Some birds use this strategy to protect their eggs and nests. In addition, birds may be stunned after hitting a window but recover after a short rest.

  • If the bird has obvious injuries, contact a professional rehabilitator for help. Follow their instructions until the bird can be taken to the professional facility.

  • Here is a link to a list of professional wild bird rehabilitators by state. If you are unable to contact a rehabilitator, contact a veterinarian for advice and a referral to a professional who can help you. 

http://www.wildcarebayarea.org/site/DocServer/9-16-10_correction.html?docID=381

  • If you must move or transport the bird, be extremely careful; many birds have strong bills and sharp claws and can injure you, especially if they are scared. Never attempt to handle a raptor if you don’t have professional training and experience.

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Thank you... its actually the link within the page that doesn't work. I was able to get that far, just not far enough to locate a rescue near me. Thank you though, I appreciate the help!

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16 minutes ago, Greenier Pastures said:

Thank you... its actually the link within the page that doesn't work. I was able to get that far, just not far enough to locate a rescue near me. Thank you though, I appreciate the help!

Try this link and see if you can navigate the website to find what you're looking for. A list of wildlife rehabilitators by state is linked at the end of the second paragraph.

https://www.discoverwildcare.org/wildlife-resources/wildlife-rescue-guide/

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You can't keep a Flicker in your house. It's not going to survive and is actually illegal. Please get this bird some help from someone who is experienced.

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Thank you lonestranger! It worked! But the closest rescue is 2 and a half hours away! I'll call in the morning to see if they have any options. I appreciate the help! I am always so nervous to post anything because the judgy mcjudgertons who offer no help, only try to shame people. I am only trying to do right... I probably wont check this again, because I can see it has already started, but I wanted to thank those of you who have been helpful! The world needs more like you!

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I volunteer at a local wildlife rescue. They normally have a network of volunteers who will transport injured animals to a permitted rehabber so please give them a call no matter how far away you live. You need both state and federal permits for almost every species of wild birds. This a link to all Penn State counties and rehabbers. Please know that although only fully licensed rehabbers can be listed - most rehabbers are training people under them with subpermits - this means that there are a lot more rehabbers out there and hopefully one fairly close to you. https://pawr.com/

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