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3 bird IDs - Oldham Pond, North Haledon, NJ


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Hi,

 

I’d like some ID help on these 3 birds that I saw today at Oldham Pond in North Haledon, NJ.  One have a pretty good idea of, so am just seeking a confirmation; another I have a reasonable guess, based on the illustration in my bird guide; but the 3rd, I’m drawing almost a complete blank.  Hope somebody will be able to help set me straight.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

Bird #1 is a Common Yellowthroat, correct?  (“Common”, perhaps; yet this my first time seeing one.)

 

47760951621_d7f498184e_z.jpgP1820216e by sbutk, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

Bird #2 looks to me like a Spotted Sandpiper.  Thoughts?

 

47708354472_469f016837_z.jpgP1820405e by sbutk, on Flickr

 

 

 

And here it is again, standing next to Bird #3. 

 

47760951021_8fa4a9003f_z.jpgP1820367e by sbutk, on Flickr

 

 

This last one is almost a complete mystery to me.  I’m almost inclined to think it’s either a G/L Yellowlegs …but the bill doesn’t seem long enough.  Here are two additional pics:

 

32817347457_49692d9903_z.jpgP1820334e by sbutk, on Flickr

 

 

32817347087_f73bb4aac9_z.jpgP1820369e by sbutk, on Flickr

 

 

As always, thanks in advance for any help/suggestions anyone is able to offer!

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1 hour ago, HamRHead said:

All are correct and your mystery bird is a Solitary Sandpiper.

 

1 hour ago, The Bird Nuts said:

I agree with HamRHead.

Learn the Common Yellowthroat's song and maybe you'll understand why they're called common. 😃  I've even heard Common Yellowthroats singing in the city (okay, Vermont doesn't really have real cities, but...).

 

Thank you both.  I'm a bit surprised to see sandpipers in this locale - two different species, to boot - but then again, I guess during long migrations, birds have to stop *somewhere* occasionally!

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19 hours ago, sbutk said:

 

 

Thank you both.  I'm a bit surprised to see sandpipers in this locale - two different species, to boot - but then again, I guess during long migrations, birds have to stop *somewhere* occasionally!

Both of those "sand"pipers are mostly found inland, luckily for those of us who live inland.

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