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My friend saw this bird in Orlando, Florida.  They saw it during April 2019.  They saw it in the afternoon, and were unsure if it was owned in captivity, or if it was a wild bird.  There were different kinds of birds around it, and this bird was just standing where, sometimes walking a little bit. 

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Posted (edited)

Welcome to Whatbird!

This is a domestic Indian Peafowl. Since this species is native to Asia, it is in captivity/free living and introduced. These birds are not native to the U.S., but there is a growing population in Florida due to the similar weather to their natural habitat.

Edited by akandula
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47 minutes ago, akandula said:

Welcome to Whatbird!

This is a domestic Indian Peafowl. Since this species is native to Asia, it is in captivity/free living and introduced. These birds are not native to the U.S., but there is a growing population in Florida due to the similar weather to their natural habitat.

Recently, the American Birding Association accepted the Indian Peafowl into the ABA area due to this breeding population.

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, Trevor L. said:

Recently, the American Birding Association accepted the Indian Peafowl into the ABA area due to this breeding population.

Where did you hear that? Last I saw they were only countable in Hawaii and possibly California. That would only be the case if the species is on Florida's official state list.

Edited by akiley

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If this helps, the peafowl are very common in many theme parks across the middle of the state, especially throughout Orlando. I've also seen them as far north as St. Augustine. These were also in a "theme park" at the Fountain of Youth. So, captivity would probably be most likely.

Miami has experienced a growing population throughout several neighborhoods though. They seem to be quite comfortable around people. 😀

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7 hours ago, akiley said:

Where did you hear that? Last I saw they were only countable in Hawaii and possibly California. That would only be the case if the species is on Florida's official state list.

@Trevor L. I am curious where you heard this too. I still do not think "countable" in Fla

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, birdbrain22 said:

@Trevor L. I am curious where you heard this too. I still do not think "countable" in Fla

I saw a wild peacock in Florida and it counted. I think I read something about it in one of the ABA magazines, but I could be wrong.

Edited by Trevor L.

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I just checked. Indian Peafowl is not countable in Florida. It would have to be on the ABA list (which it is) AND the Florida official state list (which it is not).

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8 hours ago, Trevor L. said:

I saw a wild peacock in Florida and it counted. I think I read something about it in one of the ABA magazines, but I could be wrong.

When you say it "counted"... what exactly do you mean. Florida is a funny state, there are many escaped exotics there, but not that many are " countable". It needs to be on the offical state list as akiley stated.

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It may have been an escaped exotic. I’m not sure. I just saw the peacock and reported it. All I remember is maybe reading something about a population of peacocks in Florida and seeing one.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Trevor L. said:

It may have been an escaped exotic. I’m not sure. I just saw the peacock and reported it. All I remember is maybe reading something about a population of peacocks in Florida and seeing one.

Yes, there are definitely populations of them down there. But that doesn’t mean that they’re countable. 

Edited by akiley

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Yeah and many of exotics that were considered escapes years ago, have bred over the years and some have fairly robust populations in various locations, but still unfortunately not countable.

I know someone down there is putting together some population studies on some of the parrot species that are now established in south Florida, to try and get those species placed on the FL list. As of right now, there are only 4 parrot species considered " countable', although many many more are established and doing very well.

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2 hours ago, akiley said:

Yes, there are definitely populations of them down there. But that doesn’t mean that they’re countable. 

Okay, I apologize. It seems I misunderstood what it means for a bird to ‘count’ for an area. 

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