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southisland

Great Blue Heron Eyes

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I had fun slowly sneaking up on a heron yesterday and got within about 6-8 feet. He was falling asleep so every time he closed his eyes I'd sneak up a bit more.

Never noticed before but their eyes have reddish/orange outer irises.

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4 hours ago, Bird Brain said:

Awesome photos!!

Thank you Bird Brain! It was the closest I have ever been to a heron. If it been anyone else he would have flown away. Had I lunged after him I could have grabbed him. I always wear the same outfit and some of 'em get accustomed to me and the noisy camera clicks after a while (couple years). I was in full view the whole time. Moved extremely slow and low in a squat position - my legs are so sore today!

Spectacular bird, definitely one of my favourites.

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Nice photos! There is a Little blue heron that comes by two or three times a weak.(I have a small creek that runs threw my back yard.) It is friendly and will let me walk up to it until I am about 25 feet away.

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Your field technique resulted in some great close-ups! Slow and low is the way to go. I watched a friend of mine slowly approach an American Bittern, took him almost a half hour inching his way through two feet of water on his knees, in waders, just as he was within good camera range another photographer came sloshing through the water, standing up making all sorts of splashing sounds, needless to say the bittern took off before any shots were taken! The verbal exchange afterwards was quite impressive! Yes, it's interesting to see all the fine details you can miss until you study detailed images like yours.

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3 hours ago, JimB said:

Your field technique resulted in some great close-ups! Slow and low is the way to go. I watched a friend of mine slowly approach an American Bittern, took him almost a half hour inching his way through two feet of water on his knees, in waders, just as he was within good camera range another photographer came sloshing through the water, standing up making all sorts of splashing sounds, needless to say the bittern took off before any shots were taken! The verbal exchange afterwards was quite impressive! Yes, it's interesting to see all the fine details you can miss until you study detailed images like yours.

Ha ha! Thanks Jim. I sure can relate to that. I've about given up trying to get photos at the beach here because of dogs off leash and eager folk just having no clue that the birds are going to fly away when they rush up to them. I cannot tell you how many times I have missed photos because of dogs chasing them, people throwing rocks, woo-hooing, and being general dimwits. It's a bird sanctuary and there are signs all over to keep dogs on leash but some people just don't get it. I almost don't bother on weekends anymore, and neither do the birds. I lost my shoe in the mud, fallen in the water, and waited hours for ducks to swim or fly to me.

Best things I learned - patience! And vigilance, remembering to watch/listen to what the crows and seagulls are yammering on about (osprey/eagles), and I make sure I take my camera everywhere cause of that frikk'in pod of killer whales that swam by.

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