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Little_Red_Wren

Help me identify a brown and red bird from Maryland. It definitely isn’t a robin.

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The bird was a soft, dull light brown with a red belly with black tipped red feathers on it’s belly. It was utterly enormous for a songbird and was easily double the size of the common cardinal I’m used to. It had black and brown tail feathers and lightly specked feathers around it’s eyes. It also had a beak shape suited to a more generalist lifestyle.

 

I’m not a bird watcher by any means, but I would like help in identifying this guy. It crashed into my window and my dog nearly killed the thing. I dropped the poor guy off at a wildlife rehabilitation center, but it left me worried for the bird and curious about the species since I’ve never seen a bird like this before. I’ve seen orioles, finches, hawks, falcons and hummingbirds, but never anything like this one.

 

I have no pictures since I didn’t want to disturb it since it fell into a state I think might be a coma.

 

The bird was seen in a part of Maryland known as Olny if that helps.

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Welcome to Whatbird. Hopefully someone can steer you in the right direction. In the interval, the rehab center should be able to tell you what it is. Is it too late to inquire? 

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My best guesses would be1)  juvenile American Robin - they are a dull brown with orange/red belly with lots of spotting or 2) perhaps Eastern Towhee - although I don't think they have as much spotting on them. But HamRHead made a great suggestion in that the rehab center will know for sure.

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Posted (edited)

I would go with the towhee since the bird was certainly too big to be a robin and looking at pictures of female or juvenile birds of that species, they come the closest to looking like the bird I dropped off markings wise. Besides, it died before the rehab center could do much for it much less identify it. Window collisions apparently have high mortality rates.

But the beak was shaped differently than a towhee’s. It was a little slimmer.

 

The bird looked like a mix of a towhee and a juvenile robin without any speckles, except for a few black dappled feathers on the bird’s belly.

Edited by Little_Red_Wren

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