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Corey

Any idea? (high mountains in Nevada)

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Posted (edited)

These are my best guesses:

  1. Female/immature male House Finch - note the brown overall, coarse, blurry streaking on the belly, and the conical bill.
  2. Molting immature Townsend's Solitaire - note the long tail, short bill, rounded head, gray overall, white eyering, and buffy patches on the dark wings.
Edited by akandula
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17 minutes ago, John Landon said:

Rockies subspecies Fox Sparrow, white collar patch.

That makes sense... I am not that familiar with juvenile Fox Sparrows. A question for you is why are there two distinctive buffy wingbars? Is this more common in the Slate-colored subspecies/juveniles? Thanks.

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The Eastern “red”  sub has visible but not outstanding median and primary bars.A recessive gene that may or may not occur? The western birds behave differently than the eastern,  they are not as much ground hugging.

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It's not the right shape for a Fox Sparrow.  I'm not completely sure what it is, but I think House Finch fits better.

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