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dpinkerton

N.C. shore bird help

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Spent part of the week photographing birds on the North Carolina coast.  A few are no brainers (I believe) but others are not so clear to me.  Could I ask for confirmation?

 

1. Sanderling.  If so, why does Sibling show this as winter only for N.C. ?

2. Black-bellied Plover ???  Really not sure what this is.

3. Willet

4. Semipalmated Plover ?

5. Least Sandpiper ? (early morning warm light)

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18 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

Fantastic photos!  What camera and lens are you using?

Appreciate that!  I'm using a Nikon D850 and the new 500 f/5.6 PF lens.  The 200-500 is nearly as good though for much less cost (although heavier).

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13 hours ago, dpinkerton said:

1. Sanderling.  If so, why does Sibling show this as winter only for N.C. ?

Sibley (not Sibling :classic_wink:), like many guides, uses the word 'Summer' to indicate the bird's range during it's breeding season, and 'Winter' to mean where the birds migrate to when they're not breeding.  You probably know, but breeding seasons vary between species.  Those birds that breed farthest north tend to have the shortest breeding seasons.  

According to National Geographic's 'Complete Birds of North America' (which is more detailed than a field guide), Sanderlings move out of their breeding range in July and August, so having one in coastal NC in the first week of September is expected.  Similarly, @HamRHead's Red Knots and my Spotted Sandpiper last week are northern breeders working their way south well before 'Winter' but right on schedule.

Edited by Charlie Spencer

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36 minutes ago, Charlie Spencer said:

Sibley (not Sibling :classic_wink:), like many guides, uses the word 'Summer' to indicate the bird's range during it's breeding season, and 'Winter' to mean where the birds migrate to when they're not breeding.  You probably know, but breeding seasons vary between species.  Those birds that breed farthest north tend to have the shortest breeding seasons. 

Oops, yeah ("Sibling"). 🙂  My fingers get ahead of my brain sometimes.

Thanks also for that breeding/winter clarification.  I tend to think of September still as summer or migration so your explanation is very helpful.  I hadn't thought of that. 

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31 minutes ago, blackburnian said:

Really nice assortment of the more typical eastern shorebirds. Great photos. 

Thanks!  Really fun for me to get a chance to photograph these once a year.  It's amazing to be in that environment where wading birds surround you and brown pelicans, osprey, gulls, and terns are constantly flying up and down the beach.  Definitely not the rural Pennsylvania scene I live in.

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3 minutes ago, dpinkerton said:

Thanks!  Really fun for me to get a chance to photograph these once a year.  It's amazing to be in that environment where wading birds surround you and brown pelicans, osprey, gulls, and terns are constantly flying up and down the beach.  Definitely not the rural Pennsylvania scene I live in.

I know exactly what you're talking about. Being from NC, where did you take these? I can't remember the last time I saw a Least Sandpiper on a beach. 

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1 hour ago, blackburnian said:

I know exactly what you're talking about. Being from NC, where did you take these? I can't remember the last time I saw a Least Sandpiper on a beach. 

This was in Corolla.  I saw exactly two on two separate days.  My untrained eye would not have noticed them were it not for them being next to the other larger Sanderlings. 

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4 hours ago, dpinkerton said:

This was in Corolla.  I saw exactly two on two separate days.  My untrained eye would not have noticed them were it not for them being next to the other larger Sanderlings. 

Love the northern OBX. Nothing beats Duck on a crisp October morning.

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