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Both Hermit.  Note the thin eyering, buffy flanks, extensive black spotting, and contrastive reddish tail.

Edited by akandula
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Thanks @akandula and @HamRHead. I wasn't quite 100% on the first one, but at this time of year there are only supposed to be Hermits.

Unusual question - is it possible to tell that these are different birds ? The second one has red under the bill but presumably remains of a berry?

Two Hermits is considered uncommon but a little later I definitely saw two foraging together in a wetland area, presumably the same birds, but could not get an image including them both.

Just wondering.

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6 hours ago, HamRHead said:

It looks like two different birds to me.

Very much appreciated @HamRHead.

I may not have been clear in that I know they were different birds but I was really wondering how easy it would be for the eBird reviewer to accept two Hermits at the same location at this time of year (bearing in mind how they got their name), so your response is helpful.

This "more than one is rare" count phenomenon around the second week of November is new to me - so far Pied-billed Grebe, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Great Blue Heron and presumably many others. Fairly sure the Great Blue today was a juvenile - looking longingly at a fish (I assume) below the ice cover on the river.

Thanks again.

 

Great Blue Heron juv HVT-753031.jpg

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Typically more sightings will be flagged as rare on eBird in fall migration than in spring migration, because fall migration is a bit more spread out and a little less predictable.

Later in fall, sudden cold spells and snow can ground the later, hardier mid-distance migrants, causing little pockets of migrants to build up.

I'd guess those Hermit Thrushes are juveniles based on the paler buffy fringing on the greater coverts which make it look like it has a bit of a paler brown wing bar. Juveniles are often later to migrate. Let's hope they make it! Hermit Thrushes are pretty hardy though, so I have hope. Some overwinter quite far north (up east coast at least to Cape Cod, MA; ocean moderation helps, but they seem to be able to deal with snow and sub-freezing temps).

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3 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

I'd guess those Hermit Thrushes are juveniles based on the paler buffy fringing on the greater coverts which make it look like it has a bit of a paler brown wing bar.

Very interesting (the fringing is what initially caught my attention) as well as the rest of your response regarding "hangers on". We certainly had a sudden cold spell!!

No sign of them yesterday or today so hopefully they have headed south safely.

I was just catching up today and noticed several responses from you, hope you stick around.

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