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This bird had a grayish-green back, and a yellowish chest. This bird was eating berries of a Ashe Juniper tree (More commonly known as Blue Juniper).

It seemed lager than a Orange-crowned Warbler. Sorry for the horrendous photos.

Today Palo Pinto Co. TX. Thanks!

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Edited by Kevin

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Canada Warblers have white undertail coverts, so I don't think it's that.  Do you know if it had wingbars?  I can't really tell from these photos.

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3 minutes ago, The Bird Nuts said:

Canada Warblers have white undertail coverts, so I don't think it's that.  Do you know if it had wingbars?  I can't really tell from these photos.

But of course...then maybe a Nashville? Any other horrendous photos? :classic_blink:

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Assuming it is a warbler, wintering in Texas, with yellow undertail coverts, narrows down the options.

Yellow, Palm, Orange-crowned, Wilson's, Nashville, or Prairie Warbler or Common Yellowthroat. Larger than Orange-crowned rules out everything except Palm Warbler. This bird doesn't appear to have the undertail pattern of a Palm Warbler, and looks more olive, less brown, on top.

Nashville seems like a strong possibility to me, but is slightly smaller than Orange-crowned so that may disqualify it. I suggest Nashville because the bottom tail feather seems to be unpatterned grayish color. It also seems that the vent area is not as yellow as the undertail coverts, but you describe the chest as yellow, this is good for Nashville.

However if the bird was significantly larger than an Orange-crowned Warbler, we may want to look at other options beyond warblers. The tail does not seem long enough for orioles, but perhaps tanagers could be considered. Female Westerns can be dull grayish/olive but with yellow underparts coverts. 

Nashville undertail: (but Nashville is small)

nashville.jpg.8e0ae0aa28523e1147dfae4f45fb941f.jpg

 

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Too late to edit previous post, but one more thing.

The fact that it was eating berries may also be helpful in IDing it. Most wood-warblers are mainly insectivorous, but several of them are known for eating berries or nectar in the nonbreeding season, such as Yellow-rumped, Cape May, BTBlue, etc. This could help narrow it down with a little research. Tanagers eat lots of fruits in nonbreeding season too.

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Thank you for the thoughts every one!

I can not say that it was only eating berries, but I did see it eat at least two. I would not rule out any birds because of my judgment of the size of the bird.

The only expected warblers here right now are: Orange-crowned, Pine, Yellow-rumped, and Common Yellowthroat.
 I think it may have been a Nashville Warbler. It did have some white behind the legs. As you can partly see in the second photo. (In the original post.)

13 hours ago, HamRHead said:

But of course...then maybe a Nashville? Any other horrendous photos? :classic_blink:

 

DSCN3078.JPG

Edited by Kevin

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On 12/13/2019 at 7:40 PM, The Bird Nuts said:

Do you know if it had wingbars? 

It did not.

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