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Sorry not the best photo.

I'm Thinking Coopers Hawk but not sure. Could it be a sharpie?

Grants Pass Or

coop.JPG.93aad38f6f560fbdd9803b6ff57428f5.JPG

cooper.JPG.83a0754bd42b659278142db801c03ac4.JPG

coopers.JPG.6f2c4f7c0e584ec1e804ac2eabf7dead.JPG

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Looks like a Sharpie to me. The tail feathers all appear to be the same length, and the head looks small... it's hard to tell but I don't think it has a "cap". Pretty sure the same coloration goes al the way into the nape. 

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Hard to tell, but I vote Cooper's due to the flat-topped head with the eyes toward the front, and the relatively clean and thin streaking on the breast.

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Posted (edited)

I agree with young Cooper's. Also note the wide white tip on the retrices.

Edited by akandula

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Well darn. Any ID skills I ever had have gone out the window lately. I'm still not sure, but I can see Cooper's. 

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Posted (edited)

I see wide and fairly blurry chest markings, along with some barring on the flanks, and fairly even-length retrices - - all pointing me to SSHA.

Edited by sfinmt

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SSHA is my vote.  Head looks round and small, and the white tipped tail isn’t something to reliably use.  I have had an adult SSHA hanging around with a broad white tipped tail.  

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Melierax said:

Maybe it's a Northern Goshawk 😂😂

Crested Caracara

The flat head has me in the Cooper's camp.

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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I vote Cooper's based on flat head and large bill, but convincing arguments on both sides.

When do we count the votes?

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59 minutes ago, HamRHead said:

Interesting divergence of thought here. 

Yeah, I'd love to know the diameter of that branch.  With that we could estimate the size of the bird.

@birdgurl, climb up there and wrap a measuring tape around that sucker.  Report back ASAP!

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I'm not climbing any tree. I'm 70 years old. I might make it up but coming down would be a problem.

I'm pretty much going with Coopers.

Thanks for the help.

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1 hour ago, birdgurl said:

I'm not climbing any tree. I'm 70 years old. I might make it up but coming down would be a problem.

I'm pretty much going with Coopers.

Thanks for the help.

As they say, coming down is easy; it's the sudden stop that's the problem.

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3 hours ago, birdgurl said:

I'm not climbing any tree. I'm 70 years old. I might make it up but coming down would be a problem.

I'm pretty much going with Coopers.

Thanks for the help.

What!!??!! You're only 70 and you've quit climbing trees??? I'm 73 and I still climb trees!! I just got down off the roof a few minutes ago. Been cleaning out the gutters and checking for potential leaks, etc. If you don't climb that tree and get the measurement that Charlie requested I'm going to vote for Sharpie!! 😁

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7 hours ago, birdgurl said:

I'm not climbing any tree. I'm 70 years old. I might make it up but coming down would be a problem.

I'm pretty much going with Coopers.

Thanks for the help.

Coming down is NEVER a problem -- gravity is your friend. Though it might hurt.

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Juvenile Sharp-shinneds generally have extensive cross-barring on the streaking (which also tends strongly to reddish) on the underparts. Cooper's that have cross-barring (and a lot of them do) on the streaking (which tends strongly to blackish), it is restricted to many fewer feathers and nearly always on the sides. I repeat the previous note about the white tips to the rectrices, the blocky head, with a small eye placed well forward. Additionally, the outermost rectrix on each side has a rounded tip.

When trying to ID accipiters, something important to keep in mind about tail shape and length is that juveniles and females have longer, more-rounded tails than do adults and males. This makes determining the age or the sex fairly useful in determining the species ID.

This bird is certainly a juvenile, and I have no qualms at calling it a male on general proportions.

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2 minutes ago, Tony Leukering said:

Juvenile Sharp-shinneds generally have extensive cross-barring on the streaking (which also tends strongly to reddish) on the underparts. Cooper's that have cross-barring (and a lot of them do) on the streaking (which tends strongly to blackish), it is restricted to many fewer feathers and nearly always on the sides. I repeat the previous note about the white tips to the rectrices, the blocky head, with a small eye placed well forward. Additionally, the outermost rectrix on each side has a rounded tip.

When trying to ID accipiters, something important to keep in mind about tail shape and length is that juveniles and females have longer, more-rounded tails than do adults and males. This makes determining the age or the sex fairly useful in determining the species ID.

This bird is certainly a juvenile, and I have no qualms at calling it a male on general proportions.

Are you saying you agree with Cooper's?

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