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TexasCobra

Rufous or Allen's hummingbird Texas 78070

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I have a hummingbird who visits my nectar feeder daily and has done so since November of last y.ear.  I saw him again today.  I know it is the same individual bird because he has a red or orange spot on the left side of his neck that I would estimate to be the size of the fingernail on my pinkie  His back is a bronze color rather than green or brown.  He most often visits the feeder in the morning when the feeder which faces to the west of the house is in the shadow of the roof.  I regret that I do not have a particularly good photo of him.  He is quite elusive.  

My guess is that he is an immature Rufous Hummingbird.  I have had several identifiable mature male Rufous  who frequented my feeder in the winter months of previous years.  This is the only hummingbird visitor I have observed this winter.  I welcome your suggestions for obtaining a positive identificaton.  

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Do you have any photos? I don't see one here. From your description, it would be impossible to tell which species it is. For female Rufous/Allen's Hummingbirds a good shot of the spread tail feathers is needed, or measurements taken from the bird in hand. Allen's are pretty rare in Texas, but probably overlooked amongst the more common Rufous Hummingbirds in winter. 

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Immature male Rufous Hummingbird -- although that's more of an assumption than an identification.

In SE AZ, they say about 95-97% of Rufous/Allen's are Rufous, and only 3-5% are Allen's. Based on range, I assume that ratio would be even more in favor of Rufous Hummingbird in Texas, so you're looking at conservatively a 97% chance its Rufous, but realistically probably more like 99% chance.

Edited by AlexHenry
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9 hours ago, AlexHenry said:

Immature male Rufous Hummingbird -- although that's more of an assumption than an identification.

In SE AZ, they say about 95-97% of Rufous/Allen's are Rufous, and only 3-5% are Allen's. Based on range, I assume that ratio would be even more in favor of Rufous Hummingbird in Texas, so you're looking at conservatively a 97% chance its Rufous, but realistically probably more like 99% chance.

Agreed. There is no way to identify non-adult male Rufous without spread tail shots, but Rufous is much more likely.

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