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Pacific Shorebirds along California


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1 is indeed Black Oystercatcher

The rest are all Glaucous-winged or Glaucous-winged x Western Gulls. Can’t really tell especially with the angle of the sun, for example photo 5 looks like pure Glaucous-winged but photo 3 looks like Glaucous-winged x Western, and those photos are of the same bird so idk

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13 hours ago, Jefferson Shank said:

I don't know how 3 can be the same bird as 4 and 5 because 3 has a blackish tail and 4 and 5 don't. 

Maybe check the properties / metadata of these three shots.  If the times show they were taken pretty close together, odds are it's the same bird on the same rock.  I'm with @birdbrain22 on the lighting.

Either way, it isn't the tail that's dark on #3, it's the wingtips.  

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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Maybe check the properties / metadata of these three shots.  If the times show they were taken pretty close together, odds are it's the same bird on the same rock.  I'm with @birdbrain22 on the lighting.

Either way, it isn't the tail that's dark on #3, it's the wingtips.  

I'll check when I get a chance.

And yes... I meant wingtips instead of tail.

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6 minutes ago, Jefferson Shank said:

I'll check when I get a chance.

And yes... I meant wingtips instead of tail.

"S okay, I frequently say 'Ruby-crowned Kinglet' when I really mean 'White-eyed Vireo'.  Sometimes I even say it when I really mean 'Eastern Wood-Pewee'.  Yeah, that's what I really meant to say.   :classic_blush:

Edited by Charlie Spencer
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The bird in picture #5 has very worn outer primaries on the left wing, but has grown a new middle primary, and it is extensively dark, thus ruling out pure GWGU. Interestingly, the bird in picture #3 has a right wing with very worn outer primaries and brand-spanking new middle primaries. Given the time of year -- when no adult four-year gulls in the northern hemisphere should be growing primaries, I'd say that the bird in pix 3-5 is the same bird. Additionally, the bird in picture #2, though the wing tips are not in focus, the looks worn and pointed, so, perhaps, all pix are of the same individual.

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One bit of lexicological warning. In birding, the term "shorebird" has a specific meaning in a taxonomic sense. "Shorebirds" are those species found in various suborders of the order Charadriiformes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wader [Note that this Wikipedia account uses the British term "wader," despite that Brits consider shorebirds to be "short-legged waders" as opposed to the "long-legged waders" that are herons and related groups.]

The point is that the birding term "shorebird" does not encompass the Laridae, the family of gulls, terns, and skimmers. The jaegers and skuas were formerly included in the Laridae, but have recently been split into their own family (Stercorariidae). This is critical if one uses eBird.

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The bird in picture #5 has very worn outer primaries on the left wing, but has grown a new middle primary, and it is extensively dark, thus ruling out pure GWGU. Interestingly, the bird in picture #3 has a right wing with very worn outer primaries and brand-spanking new middle primaries. Given the time of year -- when no adult four-year gulls in the northern hemisphere should be growing primaries, I'd say that the bird in pix 3-5 is the same bird. Additionally, the bird in picture #2, though the wing tips are not in focus, the looks worn and pointed, so, perhaps, all pix are of the same individual.

Then I'll mark it down as Western x Glaucous-winged Gull.

Thanks everyone for all your input!

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