Jump to content
Whatbird Community

Which hawk and why?


Recommended Posts

4 Mar 2020

There were 3 hawks flying together.  I believe (but don't know for sure) they all were the same species.  I think this is a Buteo, but...? 

Features I think I see--please correct if I am incorrectly categorizing:

Fairly broad, but not particularly long, wings for body length with "fingers"

Wings slightly pointed

Fairly long tail for Buteo (if it is a Buteo)

Dark wing linings, paler, barred flight feathers

Barred tail

Little to no secondary bulge--I have trouble seeing & grading this feature on any given bird

 

497243947__DSC1596crpd-Copy.thumb.jpg.634074513d85befabc81037ee9e49c27.jpg1755266404__DSC1597crpd-Copy.jpg.4e15668bfdaa063def66f9ed6cdf98fd.jpg

Edited by floraphile
date added
Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, floraphile said:

Could it be Red-Shouldered?  i. e., Do you think there are crescents at the wing tips?

If backlit, the crescents of a Red-shouldered should be pretty obvious. I also wouldn't expect such a compact appearance and white wing linings from adult Red-shouldered.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, floraphile said:

The wing linings are dark here.

They look white to me. I think you're confusing wing linings (also known as underwing coverts) with the trailing edge of the wing. Adult Red-shoulders usually have orange wing linings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, akandula said:

They look white to me. I think you're confusing wing linings (also known as underwing coverts) with the trailing edge of the wing. Adult Red-shoulders usually have orange wing linings.

 

18 minutes ago, akandula said:

They look white to me. I think you're confusing wing linings (also known as underwing coverts) with the trailing edge of the wing. Adult Red-shoulders usually have orange wing linings.

Hmmm.  in my picture, they look dark.  I am going by a diagram similar to this one.  http://www.paulnoll.com/Oregon/Birds/ID-wing.html

I am adding the original photo before cropping.  Maybe there is a difference in tone. 

_DSC1596 - Copy.JPG

Edited by floraphile
add media
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Tony Leukering said:

Finally, the why: The bird is a Broad-winged because both of its parents were Broad-wingeds. 😎

I have documentation showing the male parent was a 'native born' Broad-winged, but the female was actually 'naturalized' after 7 years of residency and successful completion of a test most native Broad-wingeds couldn't pass. The ceremonies are quite touching.

Edited by Charlie Spencer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...